The Behavior March 3, 2016 at 12:13 am

The good news is that a well-trained dog can learn to jump only when you order it is in a game, for example. But we are going to learn the rules until they break. Establishing the rules for greetings, always try prevent the dog from jumping in the first place. Put your hand (or both hands) in ahead of you and tell him down or still with firm, steady voice. A dog trained in this way will be able to respond to this gesture with some quickly. As with any training technique, do not enter any verbal commands until the correct behaviour has been shown.

Only when your dog is due for your account you must start using the command below to accompany the behavior. This is the way to learn the command, making that learned action is associated with the command, or the spoken order. For the most part, this type of prevention doesn’t work immediately, especially for puppies that lack of sufficient formal training. You will have to know how to react when your dog begins to jump. Above all, it’s knowing what not to do. For example, not be overly enthusiastic during your greeting. This obviously reinforces the behavior.

And not push vigorously the dog away from it. It is instinctive. The same principle is the reason for most of the cases in which dogs pull strap: are encouraged by the force exerted upon them. More force is exercised more they feel motivated to pull on the strap. You turn your back and ignore the dog. And calmly ask him who is feel. When it has calmed, and ideally would be responded to the order of sitting, then you can turn around and greet the dog. If it starts to jump again, repeat the process. Be patient, this is the moment where you get to send a message primarily through your body language, and the dog will probably have several trials to receive it.

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